Continuing Medicaid Expansion Enrollment: What can we learn from other states?

Without a doubt, the first three months of enrollment in new affordable health care coverage in Montana has been a true success. The state health agency announced yesterday that, as of March 15, over 38,000 Montanans have gained health insurance through Medicaid expansion. Our blog post earlier this week highlighted the majority of these newly enrolled individuals are living in poverty (many in deep poverty), many of whom have never been able to afford health insurance. The enrollment numbers are exceeding expectations, but it was also not surprising that the state experienced strong enrollment during the months that coincided with open enrollment for health insurance on the federal Marketplace.

It is important to note that the enrollment period for Medicaid is year-round, and the state and other partners must continue to look at ways to improve its outreach. Today, MBPC released its new report looking at some strategies that other states have utilized to expand outreach and enrollment. The report includes specific examples and lessons learned. These lessons come from a number of excellent research reports from the Kaiser Family Foundation, as well as, our direct conversations with individuals engaged in enrollment efforts in Colorado, Indiana, and Washington.

Here are some highlights:

  • Outreach materials are most effective when the information speaks specifically to the personal benefits of having insurance and can be tailored to specific regions or demographics. For example, the state of Washington provided local navigators flexibility in modifying enrollment materials for different regions of the state.
  • Continuous tracking and analysis of enrollment data by region and demographics can help the state better target outreach on an ongoing basis. For example, the Colorado Health Institute conducted a detailed analysis of uninsured levels based on zip code, allowing the state to better target outreach efforts. Colorado targeted rural areas through direct mail cards with details on who qualifies and how to apply.
  • States have also successfully utilized community locations, such as shopping malls, libraries, and schools, to educate the public about affordable health coverage and enroll individuals in Medicaid. The state of Washington set up kiosks at local malls and tied its marketing campaign to the idea of “shopping” for affordable health insurance.
  • States have found other partners that may not be directly tied to health care system to help get the word out. Colorado enrollment assisters engaged for-profit entities, including pizza delivery companies and supermarkets, to include enrollment information during delivery or checkout. Kentucky has utilized community leaders, including faith leaders, to help spread the word of health insurance opportunities.
  • Outreach efforts to inform American Indians of new coverage opportunities in Medicaid must recognize how having health insurance relates to accessing care through IHS, Tribal health clinics, Urban Indian health centers. Outreach efforts should emphasize that American Indians can continue to access care at IHS, tribal, and urban Indian clinics. Gaining access to Medicaid allows clinics to access reimbursements for services through Medicaid, which frees up IHS funds to increase and improve health services for their communities.

We encourage you to take a look at the report, and we look forward to working with our partners across the state to continue to emphasize the success of Medicaid expansion in Montana.

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